CATALOGUE ORDERS

"This Perfect River-View": The Hudson River School and Contemporaries in Private Collections in the Highlands

"This Perfect River-View": The Hudson River School and Contemporaries in Private Collections in the Highlands features forty paintings from ten local collections including works by Robert W. Weir, Edmund C. Coates, George Loring Brown, and Regis Gignoux. Also featured are several unsigned paintings related to the movement and works by naďve artists that present fantasy-like views of the Hudson. A 64-page exhibition catalogue accompanies the exhibition and includes color reproductions and detailed entries for all the works on view. The introductory essay by Dr. Grace discusses the Highlands as a source of artistic inspiration in the nineteenth century, compares the paintings to popular depictions of the Highlands at the time, and explains the challenges faced by collectors of Hudson River paintings. It also includes poetic quotations from mid-nineteenth century writers about the Highlands.

Or, you may print the PERFECT RIVER-VIEW ORDER FORM pdf file and mail to the PCHS-FSM as directed on the form.




A Ramble through the Hudson Highlands: A History in Pictures and the Writings of Donald H. MacDonald

A 56-page exhibition catalogue accompanies the exhibition and is a must-have resource for a broader and deeper understanding of local history. This publication features excerpts of MacDonald's writings, more than 100 images from the museum collection, most of which have never been published, and an appendix listing all of MacDonald's articles written for the Putnam County News and Recorder. Trudie A. Grace, the curator of the PCHS–FSM, is the editor of the catalogue and has written an introduction for it. The catalogue is available in the museum store and by mail order.

Or, you may print the HUDSON HIGHLANDS ORDER FORM pdf file and mail to the PCHS-FSM as directed on the form.


THE GILDED AGE: High Fashion and Society in the Hudson Highlands, 1865-1914

The exhibition is accompanied by an eighty–page catalogue. An essay by PCHS–FSM curator, Trudie A. Grace, "Society in the Hudson Highlands during the Gilded Age," discusses socially prominent, wealthy families from New York City and their reasons for coming to the Highlands, their country estates, their enjoyment of family activities and social life there, including dinner parties for family and friends and fetes for foreign dignitaries. An essay by Lourdes M. Font, from the Fashion Institute of Technology, "Luxury and Novelty: High Fashion in the Gilded Age," traces the history of women's fashion during the period, examines the opulent materials used in the costumes on view, and describes the development of the couture houses and department stores of the era and the experience of shopping in them. Approximately twenty black-and-white photographs, illustrations, and fashion plates will accompany the essays. The catalogue also features full-color photographs of and entries on each costume in the exhibition.

Or, you may print the GILDED AGE ORDER FORM pdf file, and mail to the PCHS-FSM as directed on the form.


AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL: WOMEN AND THE FLAG
CATALOGUES A GROUNDBREAKING EXHIBITION AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & FOUNDRY SCHOOL MUSEUM

The works from an exhibition that revealed the extent and importance of popular images of women with the flag are now available to the public in a handsome, full-color catalogue.

The catalogue includes works on paper, prints, posters, sheet music covers, postcards, and magazine and other illustrations taken from four periods of American history, spanning the Civil War through the late twentieth century.

The 96-page catalogue, which contains three scholarly essays, detailed entries on the individual works, and 98 illustrations in color, presents works from the private collection of Richard Saunders, which was showcased at the Putnam County Historical Society & Foundry School Museum in the spring of 2002.

 

Or, you may print the AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL ORDER FORM pdf file and mail to the PCHS-FSM as directed on the form.